Skip to main content

Why You Will Marry the Wrong Person By ALAIN de BOTTON

IT’S one of the things we are most afraid might happen to us. We go to great lengths to avoid it. And yet we do it all the same: We marry the wrong person.
Partly, it’s because we have a bewildering array of problems that emerge when we try to get close to others. We seem normal only to those who don’t know us very well. In a wiser, more self-aware society than our own, a standard question on any early dinner date would be: “And how are you crazy?”
Perhaps we have a latent tendency to get furious when someone disagrees with us or can relax only when we are working; perhaps we’re tricky about intimacy after sex or clam up in response to humiliation. Nobody’s perfect. The problem is that before marriage, we rarely delve into our complexities. Whenever casual relationships threaten to reveal our flaws, we blame our partners and call it a day. As for our friends, they don’t care enough to do the hard work of enlightening us. One of the privileges of being on our own is therefore the sincere impression that we are really quite easy to live with.
Our partners are no more self-aware. Naturally, we make a stab at trying to understand them. We visit their families. We look at their photos, we meet their college friends. All this contributes to a sense that we’ve done our homework. We haven’t. Marriage ends up as a hopeful, generous, infinitely kind gamble taken by two people who don’t know yet who they are or who the other might be, binding themselves to a future they cannot conceive of and have carefully avoided investigating.
For most of recorded history, people married for logical sorts of reasons: because her parcel of land adjoined yours, his family had a flourishing business, her father was the magistrate in town, there was a castle to keep up, or both sets of parents subscribed to the same interpretation of a holy text. And from such reasonable marriages, there flowed loneliness, infidelity, abuse, hardness of heart and screams heard through the nursery doors. The marriage of reason was not, in hindsight, reasonable at all; it was often expedient, narrow-minded, snobbish and exploitative. That is why what has replaced it — the marriage of feeling — has largely been spared the need to account for itself.
What matters in the marriage of feeling is that two people are drawn to each other by an overwhelming instinct and know in their hearts that it is right. Indeed, the more imprudent a marriage appears (perhaps it’s been only six months since they met; one of them has no job or both are barely out of their teens), the safer it can feel. Recklessness is taken as a counterweight to all the errors of reason, that catalyst of misery, that accountant’s demand. The prestige of instinct is the traumatized reaction against too many centuries of unreasonable reason.
But though we believe ourselves to be seeking happiness in marriage, it isn’t that simple. What we really seek is familiarity — which may well complicate any plans we might have had for happiness. We are looking to recreate, within our adult relationships, the feelings we knew so well in childhood. The love most of us will have tasted early on was often confused with other, more destructive dynamics: feelings of wanting to help an adult who was out of control, of being deprived of a parent’s warmth or scared of his anger, of not feeling secure enough to communicate our wishes. How logical, then, that we should as grown-ups find ourselves rejecting certain candidates for marriage not because they are wrong but because they are too right — too balanced, mature, understanding and reliable — given that in our hearts, such rightness feels foreign. We marry the wrong people because we don’t associate being loved with feeling happy.
We make mistakes, too, because we are so lonely. No one can be in an optimal frame of mind to choose a partner when remaining single feels unbearable. We have to be wholly at peace with the prospect of many years of solitude in order to be appropriately picky; otherwise, we risk loving no longer being single rather more than we love the partner who spared us that fate.
Finally, we marry to make a nice feeling permanent. We imagine that marriage will help us to bottle the joy we felt when the thought of proposing first came to us: Perhaps we were in Venice, on the lagoon, in a motorboat, with the evening sun throwing glitter across the sea, chatting about aspects of our souls no one ever seemed to have grasped before, with the prospect of dinner in a risotto place a little later. We married to make such sensations permanent but failed to see that there was no solid connection between these feelings and the institution of marriage.
Indeed, marriage tends decisively to move us onto another, very different and more administrative plane, which perhaps unfolds in a suburban house, with a long commute and maddening children who kill the passion from which they emerged. The only ingredient in common is the partner. And that might have been the wrong ingredient to bottle.
The good news is that it doesn’t matter if we find we have married the wrong person.
We mustn’t abandon him or her, only the founding Romantic idea upon which the Western understanding of marriage has been based the last 250 years: that a perfect being exists who can meet all our needs and satisfy our every yearning.
WE need to swap the Romantic view for a tragic (and at points comedic) awareness that every human will frustrate, anger, annoy, madden and disappoint us — and we will (without any malice) do the same to them. There can be no end to our sense of emptiness and incompleteness. But none of this is unusual or grounds for divorce. Choosing whom to commit ourselves to is merely a case of identifying which particular variety of suffering we would most like to sacrifice ourselves for.
This philosophy of pessimism offers a solution to a lot of distress and agitation around marriage. It might sound odd, but pessimism relieves the excessive imaginative pressure that our romantic culture places upon marriage. The failure of one particular partner to save us from our grief and melancholy is not an argument against that person and no sign that a union deserves to fail or be upgraded.
The person who is best suited to us is not the person who shares our every taste (he or she doesn’t exist), but the person who can negotiate differences in taste intelligently — the person who is good at disagreement. Rather than some notional idea of perfect complimentary, it is the capacity to tolerate differences with generosity that is the true marker of the “not overly wrong” person. Compatibility is an achievement of love; it must not be its precondition.
Romanticism has been unhelpful to us; it is a harsh philosophy. It has made a lot of what we go through in marriage seem exceptional and appalling. We end up lonely and convinced that our union, with its imperfections, is not “normal.” We should learn to accommodate ourselves to “wrongness,” striving always to adopt a more forgiving, humorous and kindly perspective on its multiple examples in ourselves and in our partners.FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Timeless Love Advice From 5 of My Happiest Readers By Alexandra Fox

Is there a toxic man in your life? Or worse... is there more than one? It's the holiday season - a time of hope and happiness! And I believe your LIFE should be filled with hope and happiness, as well. And toxic men should have no place in your life, period. (Make it your New Year's Resolution!) Today, I won't be giving you the usual dating advice like I usually do. Instead, I'll let five of my readers give their advice to you when it comes to dating toxic men... "Hannah's" Advice: Be Smarter Than Players My advice would be to stay away from players - they're bad news. I learned that the hard way after I first moved to the city and started dating seriously for the first time. Guys can: - Be dishonest - Cheat behind your back - Say things they don't really mean - Play with your feelings - ...and keep you coming back for more! I advise you to educate yourself about these men. Know all their tricks, and know all their weak spots... so that when a player tries to play you, yo…

Should You Date Your Polar Opposite in 2018? By Alexandra Fox

Would you rather date a man who matched your personality... or who is the opposite of you? It's an age-old debate in dating: Whether "same feather" couples are more likely to succeed than "opposites attract" couples, and vice-versa. As far as successful relationships go, "same feather" couples have a slight advantage. Since they think alike, they're better able to solve problems as a team. But at the same time, here's a warning... Don't make the mistake of thinking, "Okay, from now on, I'll only date guys who match my personality." Why? Because many of us end up JUDGING men by thinking: "Hmm, he hates Italian food, but it's my favorite... so I guess I should stop seeing him..." Or: "Hmm, he disagrees with my preferred political leaning, so I should stop seeing him..." Which is sad, because - if you'll notice - you're letting your MIND choose who to love. And remember, love isn't a MIND thing. It's a HEART…

Why Relationships Grow Cold By Alexandra Fox

Today, I'll teach you a cool trick that can turn around 
even a cold, distant, or loveless relationship. 
Better yet, I'm also about to show you how to “revisit” 
your favorite moments in your love life, even if those 
moments came from past relationships. 
What am I talking about? Just this... 
Take a minute to remember the HAPPIEST moments of your 
love life. 
It might have been early in a past or present 
relationship, when your man was still MADLY IN LOVE 
WITH YOU. 
He couldn't wait to see you, he was always texting and 
calling, or he kept giving you gifts and asking you out 
on dates. 
Those were the moments when you were really, truly, 
completely happy... even if the relationship didn't stay 
happy for long. 
Now, imagine revisiting those HAPPY moments. Imagine 
having the ability to make YOUR love life that happy 
again... and make it STAY that happy.  
YOU CAN! And all you'll need is the “cool trick” I'm about 
to teach you today. 
Of course, it's not the ONLY “cool t…

Will He Commit to You - 4 Telltale Signs By Alexandra Fox

Have you ever had a man who loved you, and then suddenly QUIT on your relationship when things started to get serious? Frustrating, isn't it? Why in the world would a man get your hopes up, only to disappoint you when it really matters? Here's the bad news: There are LOTS of men like that. They think they have what it takes to take care of a woman. But when things get serious and you start talking about commitment, they duck and run. How pathetic! The good news? You CAN keep yourself safe from these men. This newsletter will teach you how to spend less time with the cowards, and more time with the men who WILL stay with you! And it's easier than you might think. Because here's something you might not know about men... lf you love this article text loving to 77948 to donate $3 ======================================== COWARDICE IS A HABIT ======================================== You bet - a man's cowardice doesn't happen instantly. It's a habit. And you can see a man's cowardice in…

Words That Trigger Love By Alexandra Fox

Doyou sometimes get tongue-tied when talking to guys you secretlylike? Doyou sometimes say dumb/embarrassing things? Doyou keep wondering why you get so nervous and jittery whenever you're in a one-on-one conversation with a cuteguy? You might notice a certain few women around you - friends, co-workers maybe - who haveabsolutelyno problem talking to that cute new guy in the group. In fact, cute guys even seem to be DRAWN to them like a magnet. What's their secret? What dothey SAY to these guys that instantly make them feel attracted? Here's The Secret... Most women think that communicating with a man is all about "knowing the right things to say." Actually, that's only HALF of the equation. What's the other half?
Rapidly Grow Your Email List, Sell Products And Double Your Social Media Following With This One Simple Plugin By Yaro Starak
112 Comments Facebook

4 Steps to True Love By Alexandra Fox

Are you in a relationship with a man right now... or do you secretly wish you were? No matter what your situation is right now, in the Unforgettable Woman community, our goal is to help you find true love and happiness with the man of your dreams. On the journey to find true love and happiness, there are a few challenges. Most people give up and never overcome these challenges. Today I would like to share with you how to deal with the 2 biggest challenges women face in a relationship.... Challenge #1: Things Will Get Boring. The first few months of a new relationship are almost always sizzling hot. But after things settle down, the thrill fades away, and the relationship becomes a little... boring. If you've been in a failed relationship before, you know how it goes! So how do you deal with this challenge? First of all, don't panic. All relationships go through the quieter, less exciting stage after the first few months. And it's easy for the couple to miss the "good times" they share…

Texting A Guy – Tips And Tricks By Alexandra Fox

How do you "get through" to a guy who doesn't know you that well? How do you make him like you, without coming off as awkward or creepy? I discuss this and more in my e-book collection, How To Flirt With Men. Find all the answers by clicking the link below: ---> Win His Heart Starting Today!< --- Dear Afolabi, Ever wondered why it's so hard to have a good text conversation with a guy you like? It's not just texting either. It seems that chatting with a guy you like over e-mail, Facebook, Twitter, etc., seems like a hopeless cause. In the end, he either gets creeped out, friend-zones you, or simply stops replying.  DO YOU KNOW YOU CAN IMPROVE THE WELL BEING OF POOR AND DISABLED PEOPLE BY DONATING $1?.IF YES TEXT LOVING TO 77948 TO DONATE $1 OR MORE.HAPPY NOEL AND NEW YEAR IN ADVANCE What gives? Well, here's something most women don't know: Single men these days (especially the hotter ones) are bombarded with texts, e-mails, and friend requests from women. Everyday, they run …

He Led a Double Life Scott Jennings lived in a world of lies, affairs, and deceit until it all fell apart. By Mary May Larmoyeux

Scott Jennings never dreamed he would cross the line. But somehow it happened. He was unhappy at home. He loved Sherry, but … well, she was the boss at her work, and she acted like the boss at home. When things needed to be done, she would tell Scott what to do. And he got tired of it. He wasn’t one to talk about his emotions. So he turned inward. He would escape to the fire station—where he was a volunteer fire fighter—and start drinking. Things got worse after the Jennings’ son, Steven, was born in 1995. Sherry wanted to be supermom and Scott was happy to let her do it. Soon he avoided being around Sherry and Steven altogether. If Sherry went to bed early with Steven, Scott stayed up late and watched TV. He often pretended that a call had come in from the volunteer fire department, but when he left the house he would head to a local bar instead. That’s where he became friends with people who seemed to really understand him. Scott also turned to a woman at work for a listening ear. E…

Signs of a Failing Relationship By Alexandra Fox

Hi Girls!  Tell me if you've experienced this before:  Let's say you met a great new guy, and you took a liking to each other immediately.  Within a few dates, you're already in constant communication with each other.  You text every morning.  You call every few days.  You try to see each other at least once a week.  And then, one very special date, when you feel like it's time to take the relationship to the next level, you ask him if he's ready to go steady. And after a few embarrassed moments, he says YES! What follows is a great first few days of the relationship. You're ready to scream the fact to the entire world -- you're officially a couple, and you're well on your way to happily ever after!  ...Or so you thought.  Soon after the relationship started, you noticed that he's not staying in touch as often. He's not texting unless you text first.  He doesn't call as often.  He doesn't seem as interested in intimacy before.  He isn&#…